Mental rewiring: The principles that govern neuroengineering

The neurons in the brain constantly make new connections in response to every new experience or memory a person makes. As the brain familiarizes with the new experience and stimuli, the more connections are made. Thus, a task that seems overwhelming at first gradually becomes easier over time.

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Image source: cnecs.egr.uh.edu

This flexibility in accommodating new connections is one of the driving factors behind neuroengineering, which explores the ways that the brain’s connections can be trained to perform better or overcome limitations set by neurocognitive and behavioral disorders.

While the connections of the brain are in constant flux, the links between them are far from arbitrary. Several key locations govern crucial aspects of behavior and cognitive function. Neuroengineering allows doctors and other experts to use computer technology to observe or directly interact with the connection patterns within the brain.

When these connections do not form correctly or are somehow impeded due to damage, these would affect an assortment of motor, cognitive, and behavioral functions. This is especially noticeable among survivors of traumatic head injury, who may find everyday tasks significantly more difficult.

Neuroengineering technology also holds a lot of potential in helping individuals with mental disorders, problematic behavioral patterns, or lost or impaired motor or cognitive functions due to traumatic brain injury. Neuroengineering tools can diagnose potential sources of neurological dysfunction and train the brain’s neurons to gradually create new, more effective connections, which in some cases could help the brain heal itself.

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Image source: egfi-k12.org

Dr. Curtis Cripe’s work in neuroengineering and neurofeedback laid the foundation of the NTL Group’s proprietary neuroengineered therapies for cognitive repair. Visit this website for more information on the application of his work.

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